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Showing posts from October, 2020

Panna landscape Needs 2 More National Parks, Not Satellite Tiger Collaring

Ahead of the controversial Ken-Betwa Link Project (KBLP) amidst concerns over enormous environmental loss in Panna tiger reserve (PTR), two major studies have been launched quietly in the PTR -a major project for GPS Satellite collaring of 14 tigers in Panna and radio tagging of threatened vultures.  Wildlife Institute of India (WII)  is involved in both of these, one of a kind projects. All 14 tigers will be collared to study their dispersal behavior and 25 vultures will also be radio -tagged to understand movement, habits and their range of scavenging. The WII is funding both the projects which are part of the Panna Landscape planning for the KBLP. However, experts have raised eyebrows,“The project was not at all required. Tiger habits and their dispersal pattern in Panna is very well known and recorded”, they said.   “ It’s an Exercise in Futility” Eight big cats roaming in the buffer zone of the tiger reserve and 6 from Panna landscape including  the forest divisions surroundin

UNESCO's "Hope for the Planet" Cry doesn't Gel with Ken Betwa Project

When Panna was included as  the 12th  Biosphere Reserve (BR),  it was yet another recognition to  its critical tiger reserve facing threat from a river  linking project and Bunelkhand’s unique ecosystem. “UNESCO’s Man and the Biosphere (MAB) programme today (October 29) included Panna in India and Fuvahmulah and Addu Atoll (both islands)  in the Maldives, to UNESCO’s World Network of Biosphere Reserves'', the UNESCO website said. Sustainability: Hope for the Planets If we can make sustainability work at a local level, and scientifically document how it works, perhaps there is hope for the planet. That is the task UNESCO’s Man and Biosphere Programme  (MAB) was given by its Member States 49 years ago, ’the website quoted ,Guy Broucke, head of Natural Sciences, UNESCO New Delhi.  Introducing Panna as the new BR, the UNESCO said “Located in the centre of India, in the state of Madhya Pradesh, Panna is characterized by forests and marshy vegetation, with an abundance of rare medi

Bandhavgarh Needs to Step-up Efforts to Handle Man- Animal Conflict

Solo with  her cub Any news about the death of a tiger always hurts.  Suspected poisoning of a tigress, one of the most popular, big cats of Bandhavgarh national park , surrounded by about 100 villages , shocked the wildlife lovers earlier this week. Before the exact reason of her death is known and viscera were sent for forensic analysis, various theories started floating by the mushrooming tiger experts over the suspicious death of Solo, the 10 year tigress.   A latest picture of the tigress showed wound marks on her body-a deep wound near her neck exposing flesh, caused, perhaps, after fight with Chakardhara male, a ferocious tiger of the park. Tragic End of Solo: Who Killed the Tigress Solo Officially known as T42, the name Solo  was given by   a crew of the BBC some years ago while shooting for its documentary ‘The Hunt’   in the tiger reserve. Solo was born to the legendary female Rajbehra and Jobhi -male in 2011. It was Rajbehra’s first litter of cubs. Solo dethroned her mothe

World Awaits Another ‘Good News’ from Collarwali of Pench

She is just 15 and already a legend. And she is as famous as a bollywood actress. One of the most fertile tigresses of the world, Collarwali of Pench tiger reserve has many stories linked with her. Her catwalk on the pathways of the jungle ahead of tourist gypsies has made her immensely popular world over. Wildlife photographers are delighted when she walks along with their vehicles giving them ample opportunity to click pictures. But the incredibly fertile tigress is renowned more not for only giving birth to a record number of litters but also the success of their survival in the cruel world of the wild. The celebrated tigress has already given birth to 29 cubs in 8 litters, a world record of sorts. Her bulging stomach has already given birth to rumours; rumours abound in the land of Mowgli that Collarwali is pregnant yet again. Foresters, guides, mahouts- all talk about the bulging stomach of the celebrity. But the news is yet to be confirmed. However, one thing is certain -her

Big Names, Bright Colours: Bewitching World of Butterflies

As a country-wide exercise is underway to select the national butterfly of India, a dedicated group of naturalists wandering in the Amarkantak biosphere have identified some rare species including Blue Mormonand Crimson rose. So far almost 100 species   of   butterflies   have been identified in the jungles around Anuppur and Shahdol districts. Considered as the third   biggest butterfly of India,   Blue Mormonor Papilio polymnestor is a fascinating insect. It is a large swallowtail butterfly mostly found in southIndia and Sri Lanka. It is also the state butterfly of Maharashtra. Protected under the Schedule 1 of the Wildlife Protection Act, the Crimson rose is   mainly found fluttering in the Western Ghats and South Indian hills .The brightly coloured flyers are also flourishing   from the eastern end of the Himalayas to its north-western parts. This is also a common visitor to Indian gardens and can even be found in crowded urban areas. The other butterflies found in the Amarkantak