Skip to main content

Cheetah Cubs Born in Boma , Do They Have Conservation Value ?

When Aasha gave birth to three cubs in one of the enclosures  of  Kuno national park - there was good news and bad news. The good news is that this is the second litter of cheetah on Indian soil after Siyaya, another Namibia cheetah, gave birth to four cubs in March 2023 and that the animal seems to have acclimatized further in India conditions. Birth in captivity will also enhance their chances of survival. The three newborns  from Aasha have also increased the number of cheetahs in India.  The bad news is that like Siyaya's cubs, they too are born within the confines of a boma and would not get the environmental conditions required to survive in the wild. They would also be reared up by Aasha in the enclosure -safe from predators like leopards. But what does this mean? Kuno Awaits Cheetah Birth in Open Forest Cheetahs were translocated to India with a purpose. The Cheetah action plan envisages saving, conserving and developing India's grasslands .The reason for choosing cheet

Pangolin Radio Tagging Programme in MP's National Parks

        

Pangolin  Radio Tagging Programme,

It may not be an iconic wildlife species yet pangolin is the most trafficked animal on the earth - both dead and alive.  When the world was busy protecting tigers, the wildlife criminals shifted their focus to pangolin following  the increasing demand for its scales and meat in Chinese and Vietnamese markets.  More than 1,000,000 pangolins were trafficked over a 10-year period, with 2019 data indicating that a pangolin is poached every three minutes.  As the mammal started depleting alarmingly , Madhya Pradesh started a pioneering work by radio tagging pangolins with the help of Wildlife Conservation Trust (WCT) .

Radio Tagging Ray of Hope 

Pangolin  Radio Tagging Programme,

In a major conservation programme for the scaly anteater,  the radio tagging  of the shy nocturnal  animal started in the central India state in 2020 . The WCT along with  the state forest department radio-tagged the first Indian Pangolin (Manis crassicaudata) on February 14 2020 in Satpura National park . So far six pangolins have been radio tagged and rehabilitated in the wild, said Aditya Joshi, wildlife biologist with the WCT. He is overseeing the project. “ Five among the six were  the pangolins rescued from smugglers while one was wild”, Joshi said.  A similar programme may start in Nandan Kanan in Odisha soon. The individuals are monitored in the wild using telemetry to understand their habitat and movement.  The project is also an international attempt to raise awareness about pangolins and bring together various stakeholders to help protect them from extinction. 

Also readWhich animal is on the brink of extinction after increased demand from china

In most cases pangolin scales are seized after killing  the animal. Hence it is critical to focus on source sites. The rehabilitation success of these pangolins is highly dependent on site selection and post-release monitoring after radio tagging . “This is what this project is based upon”, the biologist said . There are no reliable estimates for any of the 8 species of pangolins. The challenge lies in efficiently detecting the presence of these elusive nocturnal animals. However, intensive surveys of active burrows and some indexes can be developed in the near future. One of the major challenges is the  increasing demand for pangolin meat and scales in the Southeast Asian markets, especially China. Another emerging trend is the seizure of live pangolins from locals who are not associated with wildlife poaching but are opportunistically drawn to capture pangolins due to the high monetary value cited in the media. Degradation of their habitat due to forest fires and loss of understory vegetation is also a major cause of concern.

Boiled and Roasted, Chinese Consume Pangolins 

Pangolin  Radio Tagging Programme,

Pangolins are scaly from tip to tail and can curl into a ball to protect themselves from predators in the wild. Many times even strong predators like lions have not been able to harm a pangolin as it coils into a scaly ball.  But the greed of human beings is different. Though the strong canines of predators have failed to penetrate the scaly ball, humans have poached the animal for its mean and scales. The animal is boiled to remove the scales, which are dried and roasted, then sold  for consumption in  traditional Chinese medicines among others .  

Also read:Lion Spillover From Gir National Park , Gets Closer To Ahmedabad  

However, people forget that pangolin scales are made of keratin, the same material that makes up fingernails, hair, and horn. And like rhino horn, pangolin scales have no  scientifically  proven medicinal value. Their meat is considered a delicacy and pangolin scales are used in traditional medicine and folk remedies to treat a range of ailments from asthma to rheumatism and arthritis. There is also demand in the Americas for their skins used to make leather products like boots, bags, and belts.

 Pangolin :Protector of Forest 

An adult pangolin can consume more than 0.66 pounds of termites in one meal. Thanks to their big appetite, one pangolin can protect  a large jungle area -as large as 31 football fields (41 acres) -from termite destruction. A pangolin’s scales weigh approximately 20 % of its total mass. These solid scales are their weapon and at the same time enemy too.  There are 8 pangolin species  found on two continents. They range from Vulnerable to Critically Endangered. Four species live in Africa: Black-bellied pangolin (Phataginus tetradactyla), White-bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis), Giant Ground pangolin (Smutsia gigantea) and Temminck's Ground pangolin (Smutsia temminckii). The four species found in Asia include  Indian pangolin (Manis crassicaudata), Philippine pangolin (Manis culionensis), Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica) and the Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla). 

Also readEgyptian Vultures: Victims of Myths And Misconceptions 

All these species are protected under national and international laws but that is not stopping the massive international illegal trade in pangolins, which has increased in recent years because of growing demand. All these species are protected under national and international laws, and two are listed as Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Fertility Stories Immortalise Collarwali Tigress of Pench Tiger Reserve

  She was a superstar of Pench tiger reserve . The tigress that livedmore than 16 years and delivered a record number of 29  cubs in8 litters died on January 15 evening. Collarwali, as she was fondly referred toafter a radio collar was put around her neck in 2008, was darling of wildlifetourists who would visit the tiger reserve. They would remember the tigress forher ‘catwalks’ on the pathways of the national park giving them ample opportunitiesto click pictures. She would make easy wildlife photography. Collarwali was immortalizedafter scores of national and international documentaries were made on her. The Departmentof Post in India issued a special cover envelope of Collarwali  on World Sparrow Day in 2015 Besides, NewZealand and Canada too issued personalized stamps on the tigress in the sameyear. The park director said she died because of old age complicationsin her intestine.  Apall of gloom descended over Pench while her funeral was performed on January 16. RIP Collarwali Offic

Tiger Corridor : Now Satpuda Melghat National Parks Connectivity At Risk

Much- hyped wildlife friendly NH7 passing   through the famous Kanha -Pench forest corridor and named after the two famous national parks should have 11.81 kms long under passes to let the wildlife have a safe passage. Instead the National Highways Authority of India (NHA) overlooked the rules and constructed only 4.41 km long underpasses compromising their dimensions.  Similarly in NH6, only 2.95 km of mitigation work was done against a schedule 8 kms length. Not everybody knows this truth.  Now NHAI seems to be completely violating the Wildlife (Protection) act 1973 while constructing a road patch on NH46 ( Hoshangabad -Betul). This is a functional tiger corridor connecting Melghat and Satpura tiger reserves. Now the connectivity is also as threatened as the tiger itself.  No Lessons Learnt From NH6 Kanha- Pench Corridor The reduced length of structures in  MH6  and NH7  -connecting East with the West and  North with the South  respectively -for safety of the wildlife could be achiev

Cheetah Cubs Born in Boma , Do They Have Conservation Value ?

When Aasha gave birth to three cubs in one of the enclosures  of  Kuno national park - there was good news and bad news. The good news is that this is the second litter of cheetah on Indian soil after Siyaya, another Namibia cheetah, gave birth to four cubs in March 2023 and that the animal seems to have acclimatized further in India conditions. Birth in captivity will also enhance their chances of survival. The three newborns  from Aasha have also increased the number of cheetahs in India.  The bad news is that like Siyaya's cubs, they too are born within the confines of a boma and would not get the environmental conditions required to survive in the wild. They would also be reared up by Aasha in the enclosure -safe from predators like leopards. But what does this mean? Kuno Awaits Cheetah Birth in Open Forest Cheetahs were translocated to India with a purpose. The Cheetah action plan envisages saving, conserving and developing India's grasslands .The reason for choosing cheet